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Spring Break Series: Open Trail Rides in the North Texas Wild

It's been a while. I've missed you all. 

Since this blog started five years ago to tell you about new and adventurous things to do in and around Fort Worth, I am here to help you with some ideas in the wild outdoors of the DFW backcountry just in time for planning your Spring Break. 

You don't have to travel far and empty your bank account to have an exhilarating time this Spring Break. So I will do a little series on this blog of some great ideas. And be looking for my march issue cover story in Fort Worth, TX magazine that will have you exploring areas you never thought existed in our hometown. You just thought you had to go to Utah or Colorado to enjoy the great outdoors. And don't forget to click the links I've embedded into this post for more information. 

Chisholm Trail Rides are the only OPEN trail riding experience in North Texas. Do you realize how happy this makes this thrill seeker?!? This is not your average trail ride where the horses walk at a snail'…
Recent posts

FW Children Plan Fundraiser for Hurricane Harvey Evacuees

UPDATE: In just a few hours the children not only raised $2,000 in money and gift cards for evacuees temporarily (or permanently) relocated in Fort Worth and Dallas, but also received two suburbans full of unused clothing, socks and underwear, diapers, wipes, baby bottles, formula, toys, pet treats and pet toys. We traded the donations for homemade bread and muffins, breakfast tacos, lemonade and fresh hot coffee. The community came together for this one. A special thanks to everyone who supported these children's efforts to help other children. Be looking for a Part II soon as more people come to DFW from the Texas Coast with more needs!
...  I watched my parents go through this when Katrina hit their home in New Orleans. They were displaced for nearly six months until they decided to never go back. Most of their friends never returned either. It took them 11 years to sell their home down there, having to pay two mortgages, because people didn't want to experience Katrina eve…

FW's Poserkids’ Camp with Mister Mateo: The Last Hurrah?

By Jocelyn Tatum

“Hey Jet, do you remember going to that kids’ yoga class outside on the river by Press CafĂ©?”
(His eyes light up)
“Oh yea!”
“Did you like it?”
“I did!”
“What did you like about it?”
“Ohhhhh, the list is so long it could take me all day.”
My 5-year-old leans back in his chair over a mommy-son lunch date and crosses his arms as if it may actually take him all day.
I had found out that “Mister Mateo” (Mateo Marquez) is hosting his last summer camp next week and still has a few spots left. I was feeling my son out to see if he would be interested.
“I liked it when we played crack the egg.”

(He is now smiling ear to ear remembering this one). 
He’s referring to when Mister Mateo had the children curl up in a ball with eyes closed. He went over to tap them when it was time to crack, which was timely for Easter weekend. Then each child opened their eyes to a surprise egg with a piece of candy inside. 
“I also liked the peanut butter-and-jelly pose and that he did all of t…

My Trip to Port Aransas, TX: Goodnight Summer, Goodnight Beach

My last trip of the summer takes me to the Texas coast. It's time to go after days of play, but I need one last moment on the shore. 

A few others are there doing the same. They stare out at the gilded waves reflecting the new morning sun. Two thoughts undulate in my head—someone bigger than we are had to organize this, and timelessness mixed with newness. Saltwater and waves have been around since the beginning, but the life within is new and ever-changing. Ancient Greek tragedies and comedies, settlers, explorers and travelers find their stories' epicenter in the ocean. I then remember I'm not alone in my adoration. The opening paragraphs of Moby-Dick speak to humankind's shared fascination with water:

"There now is your unsular city of the Manhattoes, belted by wharves as Indian isles by coral reefs—commerce surrounds it with her surf. Right and left, the streets take you waterward. Its extreme downtown is the battery, where that noble mole is washed by waves, an…

The First Amendment and NYC

A man with long white hair and a beard leans back against the steps reaching up to Federal Hall on 26 Wall Street. He plays the national anthem on his flute. Like the mild summer air coming off the Atlantic, the anthem ubiquitously floats around the Financial District reminding our small group where it all started.

This site was New York City’s 18th-centry City Hall where you could say the First Amendment was born. It’s no wonder newspaperman John Peter Zenger won his fight to print government corruption in his publication—the United States was born out of an intolerance for authoritarian, monarchial governments. Zenger’s acquittal marked a most important founding moment in our history—the freedom to expose injustices is no small potatoes. After all, the press is considered the fourth branch of the U.S. government, and essential part of the checks and balances system.
It was a great surprise to stumble onto this site during my latest NYC trip.

The New York City Cab Driver Who Changed My Life in 10 Minutes

My last night in New York City the cab driver taking us to dinner asked me where I was from. “Texas,” I said defensively. Everyone thinks Texans are wealthy because we are from the “Land of Bush and Oil,” so I deflected and asked him where he was from. After more prodding, he started to tell me his story, and it moved me to tears.
He grew up in poverty in Bangladesh but left for New York City 25 years ago at 40 years old. His family wasn't able to come to the U.S. until 12 years after his move.  It took him that long to get legal citizenship and safely bring them over.
He labored long hours for years as bussing tables in a restaurant at an age when his body was already tired. His English was broken, but from what I understood, he said the restaurant owner noticed his work ethic, asked him work as a cook. He soon after applied for his green card. He said after five years he took an exam and then got approval for citizenship.

The mere mention of that day un-furrowed his brows and …