There was an error in this gadget

Monday, March 31, 2014

You Can't Beat Yucatan Taco Stand's Happy Hour

While researching for a story about margaritas for a local magazine, I stopped by Yucatan Taco Stand on Magnolia Ave. Little did I know their tacos are $2 from 2-4 p.m., and their house margaritas are $4. I walked away with a tempura fish taco and a grilled vegetable taco topped with their cojita cheese and fresh cilantro, and a margarita. The total bill was $8.

"You can't beat that," said the cashier.

Nope, you can't.

Muddled jalapeño and cucumber, Republic Plata tequila, 
fresh lime juice and simple syrup served on the rocks.  

If you're wanting a custom margarita, don't be afraid to ask. They have 103 different tequilas to choose from, and ingredients like cucumber, jalapeño, coconut, cinnamon, mint and more to create your perfect margarita.

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Fort Worth's Friday on the Green is Around the Corner

I love everything about Friday on the Green in the hospital district just off of Magnolia—it's family friendly, has great food trucks, local breweries' beer, fantastic music, and it's free to the public! Not to mention it is more fun to be outside any day (unless a snownadocane strikes...or it's August in Fort Worth). This year they kick off their 6th season 7-10 p.m. Friday April 4.





Friday on the Green only runs Spring through late fall on the second Friday of each month. There will not be an event in August due to the aforementioned horrid August heat. I tried to go in August once and thought I just might die, so I am glad to see they canceled this one. 

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Pizza Snob

It's a good thing you don't have to tip at Pizza Snob (by TCU). It only seems fair to pay for the amazing gourmet ingredients you pick and watch coalesce into a delicious pizza. 


I say this because the service was unorganized, and employees frazzled. I guess that's why they seemed snob...ish.

Maybe they had a bad night.

However, it's a foodie's dream. You get to drool over ingredients like rosemary goat cheese mozzarella, smoked provolone, candied jalapeños, roasted baby portabella mushrooms and buttermilk sauce.

As you move through the line you pick your aforementioned ingredients but are only allowed up to four. Every pie goes for $7.99, and salads start at $2.99 for the tiny one, $5.99 for personal size, and a shared table salad is $8.99. We tried the kale salad, which came pre-dressed. It was pretty good, but a little
sweet for my taste. The ingredients were fresh and tasty even if it wasn't savory. 

You know how I feel about atmosphere—as you can see by the pictures it is warmly lit, friendly and well designed. I really liked the feel of the place. The only problem was my friend couldn't hear my small voice over the loud room. 

Overall, I would recommend this place. It is a new way to do pizza, but not the fast-food-feel I expected from my experience at Pie Five. They had the doors and windows open, which brought us outside on a beautiful night. 

And don't forget to order one of the two delicious craft beers they have on tap—Revolver's Blood and Honey and Rahr & Son's Blonde!!

Spicy Italian and Custom Veggie

Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Silent Films at the Kimbell


If you're looking for something cool to do besides lie around your house on the weekend, check out the Lone Star Film Society's Silent Sundays at the Kimbell's new Piano Pavilion auditorium.

While silent films seem like a hard sell, you can expect a unique experience as you watch history's first films that shaped the industry with the accompaniment of live music. Way Down East will screen 2 p.m. March 16, Strike plays 2 p.m. Sunday, April 20, and first ever Academy Award for best picture, Wings, plays 2 p.m. May 18.

I'm a little late in the game writing about this—the series kicked off Feb. 16. Their first production F. W. Murnau's "cinematic masterpiece" Sunrise had an unexpectedly large turnout. Classical pianist Robert Edwards performed his interpretation of the film live as the audience went back in time. After all, this is how moviegoers experienced film in the 1920s. And if they saw the same film three times, there may be a different musician and interpretation each time, LSFS director Alec Jhangiani said.

Without the distraction of the sometimes overstimulating dialogue and sound effects, one moviegoer said he could really experience the visual aspect more acutely. Hopefully I will see you March 16!