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New Fort Worth Restaurant Makes Sushi Simple

Temaki on Magnolia Avenue
I just found a pocket-sized sushi restaurant that leaves behind all the pretentiousness and complexity of ordering and eating sushi.

Don't get me wrong, sometimes I'm in the mood for the highfalutin experience. But if I ever want sushi simple, affordable and fast, I'm going to Temaki on Magnolia. 

That’s the owner’s intention. You don’t have to be sophisticated to get this place. There are five simple panels that hang over the cash register — sides ($3), classics ($5), temaki ($5), nigiri/sashimi ($5) and signatures ($9).

The temaki is my new favorite healthy thing to eat. It is a hand roll that reminds me of a Japanese soft taco-like treat. Brown rice, your fresh raw fish of choice and cucumbers are loosely rolled in this light seaweed thingy. Those of you who haven’t figured out chopsticks can pick this up with your hands.

The most brilliant part of this restaurant is that I had a complimentary appetizer of edamame, one brown rice California roll and the Temaki hand roll for $10.83. There wasn’t even a line on the receipt for a tip nor a tip jar.

Halleluiah.

I got my own water and enjoyed my meal with no interruptions from a server. And I didn’t have to wait for a check because I paid at the cash register. You must try it! 

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